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Author Topic: Photos of Soviet planes 1920's  (Read 7281 times)
stevehed
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« on: June 20, 2011, 09:39:39 PM »

Hi,
    A gentleman called Brian Riedel posted a link to this site on the Aerodrome. The aircraft are all WW1 types that were used by the Soviet air force during the 20's. Well worth a look and thanks to Brian and the Aerodrome.

http://www.photo-war.com/eng/tags/51/?page=1

Cheers, Steve
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learstang
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WWW
« Reply #1 on: June 21, 2011, 12:55:10 AM »

Very interesting photographs, Steve.  Thank you for posting the link!

Regards,

Jason
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"I'll sleep when I'm dead."

- Warren William Zevon

http://www.learstang.com
stevehed
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« Reply #2 on: June 23, 2011, 11:04:03 PM »

Hi,
    Posted this request on the Aerodrome after looking through the photos for the first time and have had no luck. Does anyone know how many British BE2's were sent to Russia. Did they serve with the Imperial AF first or did they come as aid to the Whites and subsequent capture and use by the Soviet AF.

Thanks in advance, Steve
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KL
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« Reply #3 on: June 24, 2011, 03:34:36 AM »

http://www.airwar.ru/enc/other1/be2e.html

В 1916 году несколько В.Е.2е поступило в Россию. До революции они использовались как учебные. В гражданской войне, из-за острой нехватки самолетов как у белых, так и у красных, эти аэропланы попали на фронт, а затем до 1925 года опять служили в качестве учебных и сельскохозяйственных машин. Такое долголетие в суровых условиях можно объяснить высокой надежностью и низкой аварийностью.

Google translator:

In 1916, several B.E.2e arrived in Russia. Before the revolution, they were used as trainers. During the civil war, due to the acute shortage of aircraft both in White and Red forces, these airplanes were sent to the front, and then until 1925 they served again as trainers and agricultural planes. Such longevity in harsh environments can be explained by high reliability and low accident rate.

Hth,
KL  Cool

« Last Edit: June 24, 2011, 06:09:57 PM by KL » Logged
stevehed
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« Reply #4 on: June 25, 2011, 01:32:14 PM »

Thanks KL,
               Great stuff. I think that has solved the mystery.

Regards,
            Steve
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stevehed
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« Reply #5 on: July 05, 2011, 10:49:36 PM »

Another question that the photos put into my head. The Anasal has twin exhaust manifolds pointing down and under the engine. I've seen pictures of the aircraft at Prague that has a manifold around the cowling but I'm hoping someone can state whether the photos are showing the original Anatra assembly or is this another post war modification this time by the Soviets.

And, what's the story behind the elephants?

Cheers, Steve
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KL
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« Reply #6 on: July 06, 2011, 05:47:05 PM »

... I've seen pictures of the aircraft at Prague that has a manifold around the cowling but I'm hoping someone can state whether the photos are showing the original Anatra assembly or is this another post war modification this time by the Soviets.



Anatra displayed in Technical Museum in Prague is one of 180 or so made for Austro-Hungarian authorities in 1918 (at that time southern Ukraine and Odessa were occupied by Austrians).

Manifold around the cowling is probably Czech post-war modification.  It hasn't been observed on any other Anasals.  

Austrian Anasal:



Period photo of Czech Anasal from Wikipedia:



Cheers,
KL
« Last Edit: July 06, 2011, 07:45:37 PM by KL » Logged
stevehed
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« Reply #7 on: July 08, 2011, 09:26:03 PM »

Thanks KL,
               I think you're probably right about the exhaust manifold modification having a Czech source. My only other thought was possibly a late FLT change during production at Odessa. Had a look at the Anatra section in Grosz, Haddow and Schiemer's Austro Hungarian Army aircraft of WW1. On pages 452-3 there are two pictures of Czech Anasals, one modified and one not, an early unmodified AH Anasal and a post war AH Anasal, with Balkancreuz, believed to be in the hands of the French - Czech military mission. The photo is blurred but is that a modified manifold sitting on the shoulder of the gentleman standing second from the right ??

Finally, does anyone have any idea why such a modification would have been thought necessary ??

TIA, Steve
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Massimo Tessitori
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« Reply #8 on: July 08, 2011, 09:40:31 PM »

Maybe to prevent oil leakages or fumes going to the pilot and windshield?
Massimo
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KL
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« Reply #9 on: July 08, 2011, 10:02:28 PM »

Hi Steve,  Smiley
I don't have Grosz, Haddow and Schiemer's Austro Hungarian Army aircraft of WW1 book, so can't comment photos.

Another supposedly Czech modification is additional tank behind the radiator and above the windscreen.  It is present on Prague Anasal and on Czech Anasal photos and not observed on other Anasals.

Cheers,
KL  Cool
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