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1/48 ICM LaGG-3 Series 1-4- COMPLETE
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Author Topic: 1/48 ICM LaGG-3 Series 1-4- COMPLETE  (Read 20817 times)
66misos
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« Reply #45 on: March 21, 2013, 11:54:50 AM »

Hi Jonbius,

I got that screenshot:



    66misos
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jonbius
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« Reply #46 on: March 21, 2013, 02:06:09 PM »

Thanks for that photo 66misos!

I've been thinking about how to add that. I'm not sure if I should try to paint it by hand, or mask it.

Thanks you for your kind words regarding my weathering. Someone else had asked about that in a PM, so here is what I wrote to them with a few additions. Please let me know if I can clarify anything.

Here are the steps I used on this kit:

- First I painted all of the base colors on the top and bottom surfaces.
- I then used a diluted solution of white craft paint to hand paint the winter camo
- After that dried, I used a very thin solution of Tamiya white to airbrush over the hand-painted portions of the winter camo to blend them in a bit
- Once that was dry, I used a method similar to the "dot filter" method used in armor modeling, using white and raw umber oils. Working a section at a time on the model, I gave it a light coat of turpenoid, an then applied small dots of both oils paints to the surface in a random pattern. Next, I used a large soft brush to streak them back on the wings, and up and down on the fuselage. The brush was lightly moistened with turpenoid. I continued this process until I thought it looked like I wanted.
- Once that dried, I made a very thin solution of turpenoid and burnt umber, and using a large brush with stiff bristles, I "splattered" the mixture on the underside of the aircraft. I did this by moistening the brush in the turpenoid/oil solution, and then "flicking" it using the edge of a thin metal plate to rake the brush against. I kept applying this until I thought it looked right. I tried to make sure and concentrate some stains where the tires would throw mud on takeoffs and landings, and where the engine would spray oil.
- Then I gave the model a coat of Future and let it dry overnight.
- Applied decals, then another coat of Future.
- I gave the model a panel line wash of burnt umber and turpenoid (I forgot to add this step in my original PM!)
- I made a very diluted mixture of 91% alcohol and a few drops of Tamiya XF-55 Deck Tan. I airbrushed this on in a very random pattern, swirling around the airbrush in loops, lines, circles, etc., almost as if "scribbling" like a child would with a crayon. The intent is to get a somewhat dirty, faded but random pattern to break up the monocromatic look further. I did this all over- across panel lines, etc., NOT just in the middle of panels. Reasoning there is paint fades/ gets dirty everywhere, not just in the middle of a panel.
- Next I made a very thin solution of 3 parts XF-69 NATO Black with 1 part XF-9 Hull Red. Using this thin mixture, I post-shaded the panel lines. It should be thin enough that it takes 2 or 3 passes before it shows.
- I used the same mixture to add/enhance the various oil streaks and stains, as well as using it for exhaust stains.
- I then used a Prismacolor Silver pencil to add a few paint chip areas on metal parts
- Final step was to add a coat of Vallejo Matt Varnish to flatten the whole thing out. I prefer my models dead flat, with no gloss. (Just personal taste really...)

On this aircraft, I wanted a heavier appearance. Sometimes I try to imagine the airplane as may have looked even if there are no photos. A photo represents one point in time. I often like to take some artistic license and think how it may have looked after much use, or maybe after some maintenance to a certain area, or maybe even how it looked before it was very weathered.

Basically, because I build so many kits per year, I have many opportunities to experiment with my weathering technique. I generally use the same basic techniques as described above, though I may vary the order.

Sometimes I may also do an additional step in the initial painting process. I'll paint the base coat, and then apply tints and shades of the basecoat to break up the monochromatic look, and then overspray it all with a thinned dilution of the original color. This works well on aircraft with a single color on top and bottom, or if the camo pattern is masked off. (For this LaGG-3 I did freehand camo.) An example of this is a P-51 I did recently in RAAF markings. For this one, I tried to get a more sun-faded look to the paint, but not quite as dirty overall.



If you are interested, you can see more photos of that P-51 here: http://goo.gl/Gojdw (as well as most of my model photos)

Each model is a slightly different adventure, depending on my mood. The methods above are my basic "toolkit", but how I use them- to what degree, and in what order- may vary slightly depending on the effect I am trying to achieve, or if I'm experimenting with a new variation or technique.

The splatter method I used is something I have only recently begun doing, as I thought my models lacked some evidence of mud, dirt, etc., that would naturally be present when flying from unimproved airstrips in varying weather conditions. I've actually been considering building an F4U-1A Corsair from the South Pacific area specifically to try some very heavy weathering techniques that will (hopefully) simulate the weather extremes those aircraft faced.

It's always an evolving process- but it's fun! Smiley
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Jon Bius
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66misos
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« Reply #47 on: March 21, 2013, 04:25:37 PM »

Hi Jonbius,
I am impressed. I saw also other your kits on your page, really very nice.

Regarding:
I've been thinking about how to add that. I'm not sure if I should try to paint it by hand, or mask it.
let me describe my freehand approach with the sharp brush (not very sophisticated):
- several deep breaths,
- stop breathing,
- several training attempts on the paper,
- still without breathing and still with rhythm in my hand painting on the kit,
- a few drops of sweat on the forehead, really deep breath and it is!  Grin

Regards,
     66misos
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B_Realistic
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« Reply #48 on: March 21, 2013, 05:08:38 PM »

I always do my camo free airbrushing. It's merely practice and practice.
@Jonbius
Thanks for the explanation. Cheesy
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jonbius
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« Reply #49 on: March 21, 2013, 06:05:44 PM »

@Jonbius
Thanks for the explanation. Cheesy

You should have it memorized by now! LOL
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Jon Bius
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« Reply #50 on: March 21, 2013, 06:14:20 PM »


Regarding:
I've been thinking about how to add that. I'm not sure if I should try to paint it by hand, or mask it.
let me describe my freehand approach with the sharp brush (not very sophisticated):
- several deep breaths,
- stop breathing,
- several training attempts on the paper,
- still without breathing and still with rhythm in my hand painting on the kit,
- a few drops of sweat on the forehead, really deep breath and it is!  Grin


No breathing! I'll pass out! Cheesy
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Jon Bius
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Massimo Tessitori
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« Reply #51 on: March 21, 2013, 08:20:34 PM »

Hi Jon,
thank you for the exhaustive explanation and compliments for the excellent result.
A question: do you use this technique with turpentine on acrylic paints, isn't it? I suppose it can't be safely utilized on an enamel base.
Regards
Massimo
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jonbius
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« Reply #52 on: March 21, 2013, 08:26:09 PM »

Hi Jon,
thank you for the exhaustive explanation and compliments for the excellent result.
A question: do you use this technique with turpentine on acrylic paints, isn't it? I suppose it can't be safely utilized on an enamel base.
Regards
Massimo

Thanks for bringing that up- I should have made mention of it.

I do use acrylics 100% of the time... well, except for NMF finishes, which I rarely do. So the turpenoid does not create any problems with the underlying paints. I've used this technique over Tamiya, Pollyscale, Vallejo, Humbrol acrylics, Model Master Acryl, and Xtracrylix.

I do have friends who have reported using the technique over enamels that have been coats with Future. However, because the surface is "slick" or smooth, the effects do do "grip" as well. The benefit of doing this over acrylics with no gloss coat is that the surface creates some tension, and the effects don't just wipe off.

It might be worth investigating, if you use enamels, to coat them with an acrylic flat coat, and test how that works. That might be a solution.
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Jon Bius
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Massimo Tessitori
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« Reply #53 on: March 21, 2013, 08:47:18 PM »

Hi Jon,

Quote
Thanks for bringing that up- I should have made mention of it.

I do use acrylics 100% of the time... well, except for NMF finishes, which I rarely do. So the turpenoid does not create any problems with the underlying paints. I've used this technique over Tamiya, Pollyscale, Vallejo, Humbrol acrylics, Model Master Acryl, and Xtracrylix.

I do have friends who have reported using the technique over enamels that have been coats with Future. However, because the surface is "slick" or smooth, the effects do do "grip" as well. The benefit of doing this over acrylics with no gloss coat is that the surface creates some tension, and the effects don't just wipe off.

It might be worth investigating, if you use enamels, to coat them with an acrylic flat coat, and test how that works. That might be a solution.

the suggestion of the matt acrylic looks very reasonable. It worths a try.
Recently I've utilized a wash with a mix of turpentine, black paint and Humbrol matt clear   over some tanks painted with acrylics, with good subcess. The Humbrol matt is used  to avoid that black pigments divide into small particles before the turpentine dries. It can be carefully washed away on protruding or flat parts with a brush with a minimal amount of turpentine on it, and gives the impression of a shadow.
Eventually I can try agan with oils, but I suppose that they are longer to dry.
Regards
Massimo

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jonbius
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« Reply #54 on: March 21, 2013, 08:59:02 PM »

Actually, the oils are thinned so much that there is very little pigment in them. I can put them on, and as soon as the turpenoid is dried up (within half an hour) I can begin work on subsequent layers. Because they are so thinned out, they dry to a workable state very quickly. I push the envelope of drying times as far as I can to see just how quickly things can be done. I've been amazed at how far you can push it! Smiley
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Jon Bius
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Seawinder
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« Reply #55 on: March 23, 2013, 07:02:03 PM »


It may look as a dogma, but officially:
1.  From 1941 to 1943 there was only one camouflage scheme:  black - green
2.  From 1941 to 1945 there was only one green camouflage colour:  4BO

Konstantin, two questions: 1. How does your second statement above relate to AMT-4/A-24? I should have thought that AMT-4 was the principal green camouflage color during that time period, although I understand that 4BO was a commercial brand name.

2: Were late version MiGs being produced late enough to be factory painted AMT-4 (A-24)/AMT-6?

Pip
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KL
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« Reply #56 on: March 24, 2013, 07:50:50 AM »

1.  4BO was developed in 1937-38.
AMT-4 nitro paint and A-24 oil paint were developed in 1941 as 4BO equivalents.  AMT-4 and A-24 were used on planes, 4BO was used on tanks, artillery, etc.

2.  so far nothing about this in available sources....  Lips Sealed
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Massimo Tessitori
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« Reply #57 on: March 24, 2013, 08:35:25 AM »

Hi
Quote
2: Were late version MiGs being produced late enough to be factory painted AMT-4 (A-24)/AMT-6?
Yes, the AMT-4/6 camo was introduced exactly the day of the war outbreak. The MiG-3 was produced up to December 1941.  It is likely that they had stocks of earlier AII green to use, but it's likely also that they ended soon.
Eventually, it is likely that they continued to use AII light blue instead of AMT-7 on many planes. I would guess from photos if to use AII blue or AMT-7.  Photos seem to show that the color of the rear fuselage was darker than other parts, although this is difficult to explain and don't seem confirmed from photos of Finnish exhibits (painted before the war).
Regards
Massimo
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Seawinder
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« Reply #58 on: March 24, 2013, 06:30:43 PM »

Thanks, Massimo! I've still got one ICM kit in the stash ... sometime.
Pip
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KL
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« Reply #59 on: March 24, 2013, 10:32:42 PM »

Yes, the AMT-4/6 camo was introduced exactly the day of the war outbreak. The MiG-3 was produced up to December 1941.  It is likely that they had stocks of earlier AII green to use, but it's likely also that they ended soon.

It realy depends when AMT paints were introduced during MiG-3 production.
MiG-3 was victim of the evacuation to the East.  It was made in one factory only (Moscov Factory No 1) Factory No1 was evacuated in Oct 1941 and then swithed to Il-2 production.
The peak of MiG-3 production was in July, August and September 1941 when about 50% of 3200 MiG-3s were made.  In last 3 months of the production only few hundreds MiG-3s were made.

Eventually, it is likely that they continued to use AII light blue instead of AMT-7 on many planes. I would guess from photos if to use AII blue or AMT-7.

AMT-7 was introduced in 1942, too late for series MiG-3s.

HTH,
KL
« Last Edit: March 24, 2013, 10:34:18 PM by KL » Logged
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