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Author Topic: An-26 1:72  (Read 28639 times)
asekular
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« Reply #15 on: March 18, 2013, 09:34:51 PM »

Thanks guys!

Massimo, I share your sentiment and think that transport aviation is unjustly neglected whereas it offers some really interesting and pretty machines. They are also substantial modeling subjects.

KL, please don't say its pistachio, I was really going for mint chocolate-chip! Wink

To be frank I don't remember the real cockpit of the 64 at all. I do remember the cargo bay was indeed light gray.

Here are some images I found on the web.







Of course I found images of An-26 cockpits that look different, but mint green appealed to me. I was also deliberating space-blue mosaic upholstery and fake-wood linoleum on the floor, but didn't want to get arrested by fashion police. Cheesy

Why I left the green so saturated? Oh boy, this will be a long one... I don't believe colors should be "whitened" for scale effect. It has nothing to do with lightness or exposure; it has to do with saturation. Objects observed afar lose saturation. Aircraft in the distance looks grey, not white. So you should be adding neutral grey to your hobby paints, not white. Models look like toys when they are over-saturated. Cockpits are the opposite. Cockpits like the one in An-26 are extremely so, as almost no light gets inside. You need more saturation to see any color when the model is finished. Anyway, this is my theory about color modulation for scale effects in a nutshell...

Cheers,
Aleks

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asekular
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« Reply #16 on: March 24, 2013, 12:33:57 PM »

Hello all,

Here?s another update on the An-26. I?m starting to chase that devil in the details again?

The main landing gear legs are supported in the engine nacelles by two lateral bushings. These bushings are cast on the inside of each half of the nacelle, so to fix the landing gear you have to sandwich it when you join the nacelles together. I noticed that the legs can pivot in these bushings and retract inside the bay, just like on the real aircraft. I decided therefore to finish, paint and weather the landing gear before assembly. I will store the legs in retracted position until the whole model is painted and then extend them for final fixing with drops of superglue through the open undercarriage bay.



I first cleaned the parts from flash and casting misalignment and then added hydraulic lines and other small details as per available photos. I've also scribed some thread around the circumference of the tires.



 

The propeller hubs are cast in two parts: front and rear and they are mere blobs of plastic straight from the sprue.  I cleaned them as much as possible and then fixed them to a length of a steel tubing for turning on my Dremel. Steel tubing will later come to be a propeller shaft.







Exhaust ports of the Ivchenko-Progress  turboprops are quite prominent on the An-26. They open to the outer side of each nacelle and consist of the external casing and inner exhaust pipe. Only the outer casing is given in the kit. I used the kit parts and thinned them considerably from the inside so that I can slide in the coaxial tube made of drinking straw (from IKEA). I also made the casing fasteners from thin strips of brass. I?m attaching some images for reference. Note the red heat coming out of the exhaust. Part of that energy contributes to the overall thrust and lift of the aircraft. And when everything cools down the inner pipe turns cobalt blue.

 





That's it for now. I will be off-line for about two weeks. When I return, I hope to have another update for you. Please be patient.

Cheers,
Aleks
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B_Realistic
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« Reply #17 on: March 24, 2013, 07:02:56 PM »

Stunning like we've expected. Cheesy
For the landing gear you've made all the wiring but you used also some small tubing where the wiring runs trough.
Are those small piping but where can you find those? Huh
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asekular
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« Reply #18 on: March 24, 2013, 08:26:40 PM »

Thanks B,

Quote
Are those small piping but where can you find those?

The small length of tubing is syringe needle cut with Dremel. You cut the point of the needle then secure it in a pin-vise and cut it to desired length.

Cheers,
Aleks
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B_Realistic
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« Reply #19 on: March 25, 2013, 12:09:17 PM »

Thanks B,

Quote
Are those small piping but where can you find those?

The small length of tubing is syringe needle cut with Dremel. You cut the point of the needle then secure it in a pin-vise and cut it to desired length.

Cheers,
Aleks

Thanks. Cheesy
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asekular
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« Reply #20 on: April 12, 2013, 11:15:01 AM »

Hello all,

just a short message to say that I am back and still working hard on my Antonov.

Unfortunately my computer is in the shop at the moment, with a hard-drive beeing replaced due to a recall from Apple. This means I will also have to reinstall and regenerate the whole system from a back-up when it comes back; so the new pictures may take a while. Heavens bless Time Machine...

Aleks
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asekular
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« Reply #21 on: April 19, 2013, 11:03:52 PM »

Hello again,

Sorry for taking so long, but better late than never, right?

The work continues on the fuselage and central section of the wing with nacelles.

So let’s start with nacelles; there is a recessed flap on the underside of each engine, just ahead of the main landing gear bay, which is represented in a kit with just a flat panel outline. I wasn’t happy with this detail so I decided to open it up and make it more authentic. Here’s how that went:





On the next image you can also see the homemade mounts for the exhaust pipes. The kit provides no positive location for these, so I decided to make my life easy when time comes to slide them in, after the model is painted and weathered.



After gluing the halves together I shaped the opening for that air flap to its final appearance using scalpel file and sandpaper. At this point the main legs are already installed and stowed in retracted position. I therefore covered the bay opening with paper to protect them from mishaps.





The fuselage was also glued together, first left and right halves and later on front and aft section. Note the pegs I made from scrap plastic for better alignment of the front and rear fuselage. Round windows of the cargo bay are in place and now masked with pieces of tape, to protect them from any scratches.



Test-fit, correct, test-fit, correct and then test-fit again! Saves you headaches later one...



People use various tools for applying putty; mine is toothpick sliced at an angle with a scalpel, to create small flat area. Slow and steady.



That’s enough for Friday night. I’ll see you all next time.

Aleks

« Last Edit: April 19, 2013, 11:09:14 PM by asekular » Logged

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learstang
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« Reply #22 on: April 20, 2013, 05:47:20 AM »

Good work, Aleks!  This should look quite nice once completed.  Having worked with Amodel kits before, I realise they can have some fit problems, but how's the accuracy and the surface detail - good, bad, so-so?  I'm really very tempted to buy me one of the An-26 series, but they do cost a bit, so I'd like to know what I'm getting into.

Regards,

Jason
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Massimo Tessitori
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« Reply #23 on: April 20, 2013, 06:20:42 PM »

Hi Aleks,
very good work till now, there is much to learn from your works.
I also use cutten toothpicks as spatulas and for a lot of other uses.
Regards
Massimo
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B_Realistic
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Posts: 373


« Reply #24 on: April 21, 2013, 03:22:53 PM »

Great improvement and the end result will be stunning. Cheesy
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asekular
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Posts: 43



« Reply #25 on: April 22, 2013, 09:22:28 PM »

Thanks guys!

Your feedback is helping to keep the morale high.  Grin

Jason, as I mentioned in one of the early posts, the detail and accuracy are quite admirable. Surface features are very fine and scale-realistic. The problem of the kit is not there; it is with white plastic and low-pressure castings. Still, I'd buy it again without hesitation. How many Bf-s and FW-s will you see between two An-s? This kit is fresh as the mountain air...

Cheers,
Aleks
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learstang
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« Reply #26 on: April 22, 2013, 10:38:39 PM »

Thanks guys!

Your feedback is helping to keep the morale high.  Grin

Jason, as I mentioned in one of the early posts, the detail and accuracy are quite admirable. Surface features are very fine and scale-realistic. The problem of the kit is not there; it is with white plastic and low-pressure castings. Still, I'd buy it again without hesitation. How many Bf-s and FW-s will you see between two An-s? This kit is fresh as the mountain air...

Cheers,
Aleks


Thank you Aleks; that's what I wanted to hear.  As an avid VVS-modeller, I'm used to limited-run type kits so I'm not afraid of a little filling and sanding.  What I'm interested in is overall accuracy and interesting subject matter.  I'm rather amused at other sites where they complain about every little fit problem.  I mean, isn't that what modelling's all about - taking a kit which needs a little work, doing the work, and making it look good?  It is to me.

Best Regards,

Jason
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asekular
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Posts: 43



« Reply #27 on: April 28, 2013, 11:49:24 PM »

Hi again,

I've been working on details of the fuselage on my An; mainly the belly - I removed (some times ago) the central rail for the rear loading ramp and now rebuilt it using thin styrene strips and some brass sheet for details. You may also see some riveting done. I am not replacing every rivet, but rather concentrating on the most visible ones according to the references I have.









I detailed the radome as well. The hinges for the front dome and the longitudinal reinforcement strips were lost in the process of sanding and puttying the fuselage, so they needed a remake.





The model is at a stage where the progress is slowed down, due to many small details that exist on the airframe. It would be easy to compromise and ignore some of this work, to quickly get to the more rewarding part of the build. Yet I believe that this is exactly the point where one should use that extra stock of patience and stay with the task at hand. Small details are after all what makes or brakes the model at the end.

So much for now. Bye,

Aleks
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Massimo Tessitori
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« Reply #28 on: April 29, 2013, 02:22:33 PM »

Hi Aleks,
I like  the new rail and hinges very much. Excellent work indeed.
Regards
Massimo
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asekular
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Posts: 43



« Reply #29 on: May 05, 2013, 09:17:37 PM »

Happy Easter to the Orthodox folk? This ?egg? is not yet painted but I started priming anyway. The fuselage and nacelles assemblies received a coat of Surfacer.

I also permanently joined the wing central section with the fuselage.  The ubiquitous Tamiya putty covering the scars again?

You may notice a piece of sprue used here as a main wing-spar. Always good to keep those straight pieces of kit frames for some later use? This time mainly to reinforce outer wing sections and help with setting of the proper anhedral.





Cheers,
Aleks
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