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Overall colour on La-9/11/15/17, Yak-9P (1948)
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Author Topic: Overall colour on La-9/11/15/17, Yak-9P (1948)  (Read 17865 times)
KL
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« Reply #30 on: January 25, 2014, 02:57:58 AM »

following links make much better color conversions.  Just enter hex color code and then click "Go".  closest FS maches are listed with similiraty expressed as percentage:

for GOST843  http://www.perbang.dk/rgb/678583/
for GOST842 http://www.perbang.dk/rgb/64857f/

FS36329 Light Gray has 92%, FS35414 Blue has 91%, etc.  Interesting...
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Massimo Tessitori
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« Reply #31 on: January 25, 2014, 08:50:05 AM »

Hi,
I am aware of the availability of digital chips both of FS and Russian colors.
The fact is that the visualization of digital chips depends both on scanner settings, the monitor settings and the subjective interpretation, because it is impossible to see the monitor chip and a materially painted surface under the same light.
It has happened that I found the visualization of known colors of Colorserver very different from the impression that they made looking at the real FS catalogue that I have; I don't think that it's fault of the catalogue itself.
Both real planes and models are materially painted, and not with RGB colors; the digital media are only a way to communicate the color of a real plane, or a real chip, to modelers.
This media can distort the color, and create problems of interpretation.
Now, if one has a real FS catalogue, he can correct distortions; else, he can't, and is left to the subjective interpretation of a digital chip that could be distorted.
For example: this altered version of the same photo gives exactly the information of the supposedly right one, when it is compared to the real fs catalogue.





Besides, the  perception changes if it is presented on a white, or a black, or a grey background.



In this example, people is already aware that it's always the same chip, but in other cases could be fooled by the contrast to the background.

Of course, lacking of a fs catalogue, one can always use any known chip as a reference, or even the cover of a publication, if it is included in the photo; but lacking of such reference, digital colors are indicative only.

Regards
Massimo
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KL
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« Reply #32 on: January 26, 2014, 09:27:00 AM »

It has already been mentioned, rgb colour space is a superior way to describe colour than limited number of FS chips.  In the case of ALG-16, closest FS chips have around 90% similarity.  This also means about 10% difference which is considerable considering how sensitive human eyes are.  We can all clearly see that FS matches are not perfect.

There is also another reason why we have to think digital:  everything around us is digital - photography is digital, music is digital, your profiles can be considered as digital art.  Monitor you are looking at shows you digital colours.

FS595 deck is an anachronism that survives among modellers only because the average modeller is a middle age computer illiterate male.

We (middle age computer illiterate males) should all learn how to calibrate our monitors, how to make photos with realistic colour representation, how to use Photoshop - and forget FS595.

Cheers,
KL   
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Massimo Tessitori
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« Reply #33 on: January 26, 2014, 10:55:09 AM »

You can certainly paint planes and models with rgb colors, if they exist in a computer. RGB colors are given by the sum of three lights: red, green, blue.
Material planes, as  material models, are painted with paints that don't emit RGB light, but adsorb a spectrum of frequencies from the light they receive, and reflect what is not adsorbed.
Should I have to paint a material model, I can:
use the photo (both digital or printed) showing the FS chips aside the Russian chip, supposed to be taken under the same light;
then  choose the closer one, even if they are not exactly corresponding;
then have a look to the  material FS chip;
then choose or mix my paints till to match a color that shows, compared to the FS chip, the same difference that I see between the chips on the photo, always supposing to see the paint and the FS chip under the same light.
Now, apart for the subjective calibration of monitors and scanners, could you explain to me how to see a chip on the monitor and a materal paint under the same light, side by side?
Regards
Massimo
« Last Edit: January 26, 2014, 09:53:01 PM by Massimo Tessitori » Logged
66misos
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Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence.


WWW
« Reply #34 on: May 13, 2014, 10:31:07 PM »

Hi,
l found this picture of Korean all-grey Yak-9 at
http://www.vintagewings.ca/VintageNews/Stories/tabid/116/articleType/ArticleView/articleId/394/language/en-CA/WTF.aspx


regards,
   66misos

« Last Edit: May 14, 2014, 05:31:57 AM by 66misos » Logged

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