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Author Topic: Alexei Aleluhin's Yak-1 from Schtockus  (Read 8302 times)
Massimo Tessitori
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« on: August 18, 2007, 10:03:40 AM »

Hi, I'm uploading here some images and text from Schtockus on his request.  :)Thank you for sharing your research.


Aleluhin served as a squadron leader
in the most successful Soviet regiment - the 9-th
Guards regiment. It was formed on the direct order of
the marshal Alexander Novikov - the head of the Soviet
airforce. By the end of the war Aleluhin had 40
personal and 17 shared victories. Actually his score
was higher, but in VVS RKKA was a tradition - every
fifth plane you shot down should be given to your
wingman. Also victories were shared with pilots from
his squadron who were nominated to a high award and
badly needed some more victories to get it. I hope my
stuff will be of some intetest to you.
   P.S. You may note that the Leopard teraing the
heart is painted on both sides of the plane. Actually
all Yaks of Aleluhin's squadron were decorated with
this picture. The only difference of Aleluhin's Yak
was a red arrow painted under and on top of the
fuselage thus giving the pilots of his squadron the
notion how to distinquish their leader.








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Audrius
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« Reply #1 on: August 22, 2007, 09:04:32 PM »

hello
it is a nice work by Schtockus. Anyway I doubt that the the emblem was on both ports of Yak-1.
The picture with pilot standing in the cockpit is a mirror reflection. At least the source (http://www.bellabs.ru/Fotab/I-69-9/I-69-9.html) where this pictures first appeared gives us in this way:



IMHO it was only on the right port of Yak-1.

BTW in the same page (http://www.bellabs.ru/Fotab/I-69-9/I-69-9.html) you can see Yak-1 of Amet-Khan Sultan from same regiment. In deed his Yak has an emblem too, but for sure not of the same type. Anyone has a clue what it could be painted?



and a zoom:



As well Schtockus is mentioning some red arrow painted under and on top of the
fuselage
. I can't observe it on the pictures above neither his profile. Honestly it's quite unclear what positions he meant the arrow was (if was?) painted.

BR Audrius
« Last Edit: August 23, 2007, 10:58:58 PM by Audrius » Logged
John Thompson
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« Reply #2 on: August 23, 2007, 02:11:10 AM »

If you look at the first image in Massimo's post, this photo shows both the fuselage artwork and one blade of the propellor. Viewed from the cockpit, the prop would rotate counter-clockwise, and the blade shape in this photo shows this correctly, so the artwork definitely appeared on the right side, at least. This doesn't prove that the artwork was NOT on both sides. If we could assume that both photos (Aleluhin still in the cockpit and A. standing on the wing) were taken at the same time, this would probably prove that the third image in Massimo's post which is supposed to show artwork on the left side is from a mirror-image (or "flipped negative") print, as Audrius says (the two images are obviously the same - note the cloud patterns in the background - the question is whether it's Massimo's image or Audrius's which is "flipped"). Of course, it's always possible the photographer took a shot from the left, showing A. still in the cockpit, then ran around to the right side, and took another of him climbing out, but I think I am stretching things a bit now...? Wink

I looked for left/right evidence in the photo which is being debated (the one with him still in the cockpit), but could not find any, except for a small badge or medal on one of his jacket lapels. This could have been worn either on the left or right (unless someone can tell us that it was a particular badge, always worn on one side or the other), so that does not help. Too bad he's not wearing a wedding ring on one hand - this would most likely be the left one!? Wink

John
« Last Edit: August 23, 2007, 02:42:59 AM by John Thompson » Logged
John Thompson
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« Reply #3 on: August 23, 2007, 02:52:14 AM »

Aarrrgh!!!? Roll Eyes Okay, here's the clincher - I forgot something. On the Yak-1b (and several other Yaks) there was an additional metal panel on the left fuselage side just behind the cockpit. This panel was on the left side only. The version of the photo in Massimo's post should show this panel if the photo was taken from the left and printed correctly from the negative; however, the panel is NOT visible - we can see the rib/fabric structure in the area where this panel would be, so the photo is of the right side of the fuselage, and the image is "flipped" or mirrored. This suggests that the version shown in Audrius's post is correct, and that the photo was actually taken from the right side of the fuselage. I'll stop now...? Wink

John
« Last Edit: August 23, 2007, 03:06:58 AM by John Thompson » Logged
Dark Green Man
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« Reply #4 on: August 23, 2007, 07:00:49 AM »


most Soviet medals I've seen are on the left side.
I suppose that some medals might be acceptable on either side.
(when they have so many that they run out of room , then they go on the right? Grin )

also please correct me if I am wrong but don't they wear the wedding band on the right side in European countries?

[/color]
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"when we lose the right to be different, we lose the priviledge to be free"--Charles Evans Hughes
John Thompson
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« Reply #5 on: August 23, 2007, 05:18:40 PM »

Hi DGM! Yes, I had the same thought regarding an overflow of medals from left to right! Anyway, I hope my second post (maybe I should have just deleted, or edited out of existence, my first babbling post!) supports correctly Audrius's point about image reversal.

John
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Schtockus
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« Reply #6 on: August 27, 2007, 12:25:04 PM »

 Actually the information I've posted comes from an interview with Aleluhin published in 1983. There's one thing typical to all fighter pilots of WW 2 - they enterd their cockpits from the left side. Hence the artwork always appeared on that side of the plane. I send Massimo one more foto of the plane taken from the right side where the beast is also well seen.
    Regarding Amet Han Sultan - he was a squadron leader of another squadron of thq 9-th Guards fighter regiment - hence the other type of decotation. I've got three fotos of his La-7. It sported an eagle's silluette across the moon with a FW 190 in its claws. Most probably the painting on his Yak had some correspondece to it.
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Massimo Tessitori
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« Reply #7 on: August 28, 2007, 09:27:33 PM »

Hi, here is your image? of Aleluhin. Smiley



And here is the La-7 of Amet Khan.







from these photos, one can see that there is an arrow painted on the side, that can be interpreted as a white arrow darkened by smoke (but it could also appear as a red arrow). 

Massimo
« Last Edit: August 28, 2007, 09:38:45 PM by Massimo Tessitori » Logged
Schtockus
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« Reply #8 on: August 28, 2007, 10:45:18 PM »

Massimo, I'll send you a profile of Amet Han's La-7. The arrow was white - the common sign of all regiments of 303 Division, to which the Regiment was assigned at the end of war. The moon was yellow and the nose of the plane was red, although on this foto it looks like white. Noses of all La-7s of the 9-th Guards Fighter Regiment were painted red including the spinner. This fotos were made in East Prussia, airbase Tapiau, April 1945.
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Massimo Tessitori
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« Reply #9 on: September 05, 2007, 10:12:12 PM »

Hi,  Smiley
I am uploading some further images and text from Schtockus


Here is my drawing of Amet Han's La-7
and some fotos of Amet Han and Aleluhin. The La-7 of
Aleluhin gives a clear notion that cowling and spinner
were of the same colour
.










My comments: so, your idea about the spinners in the front image of the planes in the hangar is that only the reflex of sun makes their spinners look as painted with light color? Interesting...
The profile of La-7 is of very good graphic quality. Did you draw it, really? If you made the drawing divided by layers, you could quickly draw a whole gallery of La-7s profiles.

Massimo
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John Thompson
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« Reply #10 on: September 06, 2007, 01:58:34 AM »

I started digging around in my collection (if I can be allowed to call something so disorganized a "collection") and found some information that might interest those considering building the La-7s of Sultan Amet Khan and Alexei Aleluhin in 1/72 scale (which was what started me digging in the first place):

 - Decals for both pilots are included in both the Eduard Profi-pack and Dual Combo kits (the decal sheets are identical in both releases). The "eagle" emblem on Khan's aircraft has a white background, and appears much too small compared with photos. The white arrow markings are included, with a thin red outline. For Aleluhin, again the heart-and-arrow marking appears slightly too small, but the fuselage inscriptions might be okay, although they, too, may be just a bit smaller than they should be. However, the pilot of Aleluhin's aircraft is given in the instruction sheet as "Capt. P. Ya. Golovachev - 9.GIAP 303.IAD".

- The Eduard decal sheet "Russian WWII Aces Vol.2" (72-002) includes Khan's La-7. The "eagle" emblems look about the right size, but have a pale blue-grey background. No fuselage-side arrow markings are included, only the numerals.

- The old Super Scale International decal sheet "WWII Russian Aces Lag-5 and 7, Kostylev, Kozhedub, Popkov" (72-345) also includes one anonymous La-7, described as "La-7 belonging to an unidentified IAP on the central sector of the front". For this one, the decal sheet provides markings for Aleluhin's aircraft! Despite the age and relative crudeness of this sheet, the heart-and-arrow markings look to be about right in size. The fuselage inscriptions look somewhat odd, but they appear to be usable. Again considering the age of this sheet, the camouflage instructions calling for "Dark Green" and "Brown" can be forgiven, I think!? Wink

John
« Last Edit: September 06, 2007, 02:13:12 AM by John Thompson » Logged
Dark Green Man
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« Reply #11 on: September 07, 2007, 07:42:57 AM »


- The old Super Scale International decal sheet "WWII Russian Aces Lag-5 and 7, Kostylev, Kozhedub, Popkov" (72-345) also includes one anonymous La-7, described as "La-7 belonging to an unidentified IAP on the central sector of the front". For this one, the decal sheet provides markings for Alelyukhin's aircraft! Despite the age and relative crudeness of this sheet, the heart-and-arrow markings look to be about right in size. The fuselage inscriptions look somewhat odd, but they appear to be usable. Again considering the age of this sheet, the camouflage instructions calling for "Dark Green" and "Brown" can be forgiven, I think!? Wink

John


Ha !? John,
I've already beaten you to it !
http://vvs.hobbyvista.com/ModelGallery/la7_72.php
although if I may beg for your forgiveness as my model is not very good. Embarrassed
if someone else wants to do this plane again I would highly recommend
using the excellent Eduard kit .
[/color]
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"when we lose the right to be different, we lose the priviledge to be free"--Charles Evans Hughes
Schtockus
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« Reply #12 on: September 15, 2007, 05:10:25 PM »

   The further story of Aleluhin's La-7 is much more interesting. In the beginning of April 1945 Aleluhin once had a dinner in a company of his friends including the chief mechanic of his plane. "I think - said Aleluhin to his friends - "that it would be good to paint a La-7 all red and put on a pedestal as a monument to our victory when the war is over". Next morning hearing "scramble" Aleluhin rushed to his plane. To his surprise he saw his La-7 totally painted red. Aleluhin was schocked - his mechanic understood Aleluhin's  words in his own way. "I thought I will shoot him down" - Alelhin said in one of hisinterviews. But "scramble" is "scramble" and Aleluhin took of in a red La. So the last three or four weeks of war he flew in a totally red La. Russian "Red baron" so to say. Smiley)) I'll send the drawings of red La to Massimo so that he could put them on the site.
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Massimo Tessitori
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« Reply #13 on: September 17, 2007, 09:27:30 PM »

Hi, Smiley
here are the images from Schtockus:





Nice looking plane, isn't it? Who knows if the undersurfaces were really left light blue?
Thank you for sharing them

Massimo
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Schtockus
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« Reply #14 on: September 18, 2007, 10:06:41 AM »

  Actually I was drawing my profile deriving it from the drawing in the magazine. They, in they turn drew it following the interview with Aleluhin. Unfortunately I don't have any other sources.  Sad
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